MYTH: You can’t hurt yourself doing yoga

MYTH: You can’t hurt yourself doing yoga. FACT: You can hurt yourself doing almost anything, including yoga. Depending on what yoga style you practice, you have a higher or lower risk of injury depending on aggressive approach and lack of attention to alignment. It’s a bit of a dirty little secret, but for yoga practitioners, injury to the sacroiliac joint, neck, knee, and shoulder are not uncommon. Yes, you can hurt yourself doing yoga. There is still a great deal of controversy over how high or low the numbers of yoga-caused injuries are. Partly because the numbers are difficult to…

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SI Joint injury & Yoga: Key Points

[SI joint injury frequently intersects with other causes of low back pain, such as bulging discs, arthritis, and muscular strains; these guidelines are also appropriate for injuries to low back, pelvis, & hips.] Previously: SI Joint Dysfunction Intro, SI Joint Injury & Yoga practice To begin with, you need to understand the difference between pain and discomfort. Discomfort, as in a stretching or burning sensation, is bearable and may even improve during the posture. Some small amount of discomfort is to be expected during class. Pain is a different sensation – stronger, sharper, unbearable. NO PAIN. Any increase in pain is a…

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SI Joint injury & Yoga: TAKE A BREAK

[SI joint injury frequently intersects with other causes of low back pain, such as bulging discs, arthritis, and muscular strains; these guidelines are also appropriate for injuries to low back, pelvis, & hips.] Previously: SI Joint Dysfunction Intro, SI Joint Injury & Yoga practice I will talk more about SI Joint & low back injury management and specific postures in the Bikram Yoga series in the future. I am sharing safe guidelines to approach a yoga practice WITH an injury to the SI Joint (and by extension, most injuries to the back, low back, hips, pelvis, etc etc etc.), because if you insist…

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SI Joint injury & Yoga practice

[SI joint injury frequently intersects with other causes of low back pain, such as bulging discs, arthritis, and muscular strains; these guidelines are also appropriate for injuries to low back, pelvis, & hips.] Previously: SI Joint Dysfunction intro The goal for practice should be to increase body awareness, maintain healthy range of motion, and receive maximum health benefits without exacerbating the existing injury. A consistent, mindful practice is key. Flexibility is not the goal – mobility without pain is the goal. Flexibility is part of the problem. You want strength and stability in the SI joint – not flexibility. Use yoga…

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You Can’t Go Back

Sometimes we set weight & number goals, often based on previous weight or how we looked at some earlier point in our lives. Or we set mobility or fitness goals based upon some other period. Here’s the thing: we grow older and our bodies change. 125 lbs at 21 may have been fantastic and healthy and gorgeous – but if you’re 31, 41, 51 … it may be unreasonable: not because “older” means “bigger” or “fatter” or “less attractive” or any other descriptives that may have emotional baggage associated with them, but simply because our bodies change over time. Perhaps…

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SI Joint Dysfunction intro

The sacroiliac joint or SI joint is the joint in the bony pelvis between the sacrum and the ilium of the pelvis, which are joined by strong ligaments. The sacrum supports the spine and is supported in turn by an ilium on each side. The joint is a strong, weight bearing synovial joint with irregular elevations and depressions that produces interlocking of the two bones. The human body has two sacroiliac joints, one on the left and one on the right, that often match each other but are highly variable from person to person. IN SHORT: the SI joint is…

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